Congressman Jared Huffman

Representing the 2nd District of California

Huffman: Snow in Winter Doesn’t Disprove Climate Change

Dec 10, 2013
Press Release
Huffman: “The fact that it is snowing simply means that it is snowing”

WASHINGTON­—Congressman Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) spoke on the House Floor today and reminded his colleagues that snow in winter doesn’t disprove climate change—it just means that it snowed. Huffman noted that California is experiencing the driest year on record and that we need to start adapting to the changes that are happening, including changing the operation of our reservoirs from following out-of-date water manuals to using modern science and weather forecasting.

“You hear that because it is snowing there must not be climate change. Well, Mr. Speaker, Winter happens every year. The fact that it is snowing simply means that it’s snowing,” Huffman said. “Look at California, where we are experiencing the driest year on record. We need to start getting serious about our response to climate change… one place to start is how we operate our reservoirs.”

A video of Huffman’s speech can be found HERE:

A transcript of Huffman’s speech can be found below:

“Mr. Speaker,

The weather outside is frightful, and if you listen to certain conservative media networks, you hear something not so delightful. You hear that because it is snowing there must not be climate change.

This is unscientific, it is reductive, but that’s what climate deniers say this time of year.

Well, Mr. Speaker, winter happens every year. The fact that it is snowing simply means that it’s snowing.

Instead of looking at December snowflakes we should be looking at the science. Since 1970, not that long ago, winter temperatures have increased an average of 0.55 degrees per decade, reducing snowpacks and creating water shortages across the country. If you want to look at something immediate, look at California, where we are experiencing the driest year on record.

That’s why we need to start getting serious about our response to climate change. We need to adopt new policies, and adapt to the changes that are happening.

One place to start is how we operate our reservoirs. Instead of relying on old-school water manuals that are decades out of date, we should be using on science and modern weather forecasting.

Our water supply, our food supply, and our future will all be impacted by climate change, so let’s lead.”

###